Guides

Secrets of the Seashore: A Multiple Intelligences Book Study

Find Out What Mulitple Intelligence Theory Is

And Why We Should Care Here

 

The book Secrets of the Seashore written by Carron Brown is one in a series from

the Shine A Light Books available from Usborne and More. This series is an ingenious and

engaging way to wrap little people’s minds around the wonders of our world! You can order

your own copy of Secrets of the Seashore HERE

Verbal/Linguistic

As with any picture book, repetition is key. Each time you read through with your child, focus on a different aspect. The first time you read through you may do a “picture walk” or simply focus on the pictures and making predictions. With the Shine A Light series, this is particularly true. The pictures are so engaging and fun– you will more than likely need to use a flashlight to make your hidden discoveries in the pictures many, many times before your child will be ready to focus on the words. Non-fiction books are amazing tools to increase vocabulary sets, make generalizations about the world, as well as sort and categorize objects within their world. Use Secrets of the Seashore as a springboard to explore these topics more in depth; How is a whelk and a snail similar/different? What is a crustacean? Why does the tide come in and out? What other kinds of animals are filter feeders? You may want to reference an encyclopedia such as Usborne’s First Encyclopedia of Seas and Oceans with Internet Links!

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Visual/Spatial

For our visual spatial learners we re-created our own version of a Shine A Light picture! You will need a piece of black construction paper, a piece of white construction paper, scissors, glue, a white crayon or piece of chalk, and crayons, markers, paint, etc.

On the black piece of construction paper, use the white crayon or chalk to re-create a tide pool scene. In our version, I tried to draw a crab and a whelk and Peanut drew a “rock” and an “anemone.”

 

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Next we cut the images we traced out, leaving the rest of the construction paper intact.

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We then put glue on all of the black areas, paying special attention to the edges.

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After the glue is applied, carefully place a piece of white construction paper on top of the glue, making sure to line up the outer edges. Once the white construction paper is in place, color a scene using crayons, markers, or paint. We used a peeled crayon because I wanted to show Peanut how to color using the side of the crayon to cover a large area and give it an interesting texture.

Once your scene is complete, hold your artwork up to the light. Voila! Your own secret pictures appear!

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Logical/Mathematical

In order to develop a healthy appreciation for number and math concepts, little people need to be exposed to and experiment with these numbers and mathematical concepts in all areas of life! Rather than saying, “ok, it’s math time,” it’s much more useful to our kids if we just incorporate counting, sorting, organizing, adding, etc. throughout our day. Believe it or not, they are not entirely sure that “8 seashells” is the same thing as “8 rocks” and so they must investigate and touch both materials, counting them over and over – making sure there are still 8 even if we move them around. So, for this example we are using seashells (mainly because I had them leftover from a previous book study) as our math manipulatives, but in reality we also counted and sorted the rocks we used in our kinesthetic activity. (As well as our tide pool creatures and the animals in the illustrations.)

Here we are sequencing our seashells in order from biggest to smallest.

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Sorting by type

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And sorting by texture

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Bodily/Kinesthetic

For our tactile kinesthetic learners we set up a mock tide pool to explore and touch. In our tidepool we used rocks, seashells, and assorted toy tidepool creatures such as sea stars, an octopus, sea weed, and several fish.

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For our gross motor kinesthetic learners we decided to take the Shine A Light concept to the real world! I hid several of her tidepool objects around her room and turned off the lights. She then used a flashlight to find them! This was a particularly fun game for her and she wanted to do it again and again…

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…and again

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Musical/Rhythmic

Experimenting with the natural sounds that seashells create is always a fun time! Let your little one listen to the sounds that each shell makes and compare them…is one a higher sound than another? Lower? Does the shape change how it sounds? How about the size?

 

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Once they have had general exploration and play with the natural sounds seashells make…turn one of the larger, closed conical shells into a trumpet! Cut off the very tip of the shell just big enough to blow into and bore a hole into the side. Voila! Your very own seashell trumpet!

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And of course seashells always make good drums! In fact, they are especially good for hearing the contrast in tones between differing sizes.

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After a little exploration time, she was able to figure out on her own that she could put small seashells inside the larger seashell to make maracas!

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Intrapersonal

Intrapersonal learners need time for reflection and introspection. Make sure to provide your little one with a comfy place for independent exploration.

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…One can never have too many secret reading spots!

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Interpersonal

Interpersonal learners need to process their information with a buddy. They may need to verbalize their thinking – or – they just need someone to share in their experience!

 

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Like these ideas? Check out www.rainbootsandrocketships.com for more!


Rainbootsandrockeships.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This is a for-profit site that I put together in 12 minute increments while my toddler is busy eating a snack. Teachers don’t make diddly and I’d like to retire someday. Please consider purchasing any supplies you would order anyway through one of the Amazon links located throughout my posts!

Usborne Publishing Ltd. has no connection with these pages and does not sponsor or support their content.

 

I’m A Dirty Dinosaur-A Multiple Intelligences Book Study

Find Out What Multiple Intelligences Theory Is

And Why We Should Care Here

The book “I’m A Dirty Dinosaur” written by Janeen Brian and Ann James is a

fun, silly story of a dinosaur who loves mud! You can purchase your own copy HERE

Verbal/Linguistic

As with any picture book, repetition is key. Each time you read through with your little one, focus on a different aspect. The first time you may just want to do a “picture walk” – in other words just look at the pictures and talk about what is happening on each page. What does your child think the story is about? What do they think will happen next?

Another read through and you can focus on vocabulary development…for example, “what does the word “snout” mean?” Or rhyming words…such as “snout and about”

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Visual/Spatial

We took a page that peanut especially liked and I made a “vague representation” of the dinosaur illustrated on the page. I just drew my version on construction paper, we cut it out, and she glued it on another piece of construction paper. We then took shaving cream and brown finger paint and mixed them together to create “mud.”

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Here is our finished version!

 

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Musical/Rhythmic

“I’m A Dirty Dinosaur” has a natural tone and rhythm to it. In addition, there are verses that specifically give musical representations. For example, “Tap, Tap, Tap, Tap, Tap It Like A Drum” During one of your read throughs, reenact the chorus using musical instruments, whether you have your own or are playing the environment. For example, you could use the table as the drums!

 

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Or—“Shake, Shake, Shake, Shake, Shake About The Place! – with maracas!

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Logical/Mathematical

We took some bright toy dinosaurs and decided to get them dirty. I like to use kinetic sand, but a sandbox or real mud pile would be just as fun! After just exploring the dinosaurs and the sand together for some sensory input, we began to sort them by color…

 

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And Create Patterns

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We then rolled a large die and counted the pips.

We then added in the corresponding number of dinosaurs.

 

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To increase complexity, I modeled for her the different combinations of number sentences that could create her matching number. For example, 3 green dinosaurs and 1 yellow dinosaur, 2 green dinosaurs and 2 yellow dinosaurs, 1 green dinosaur and 3 yellow dinosaurs, or all 4 yellow dinosaurs, etc.

 

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Bodily/Kinesthetic

For fine motor/tactile learners we took the toy dinosaurs and acted out the phrases from the book with our leftover shaving cream “mud.” For example, when the book says “I’m a dirty dinosaur with a dirty snout” we smeared mud all over his nose. Once we reached the end of the book and our dinosaurs were sufficiently dirty…

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we gave them a good bath!

 

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For gross motor learners, we acted out the scenes from the story using our whole bodies. For example, when you get to the part that says “Stamp, Stamp, Stamp, Stamp, Stamp About the Street!” you would stomp all around the living room!  An alternative activity would be to continue with the shaving cream mud into the bathtub and have them smear the mud on their own bodies before giving themselves a good wash. Here is our whole body version of “Shake, Shake, Shaking it!”

 

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Intrapersonal

Intrapersonal learners need time for reflection and introspection. Make sure to provide your little one with a comfy place for independent exploration.

 

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Interpersonal

Interpersonal learners need to process their information with a buddy. They may need to verbalize their thinking – or – they just need someone to share in their experience!

 

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Like these ideas? Check out www.rainbootsandrocketships.com for more!


 

Rainbootsandrockeships.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This is a for-profit site that I put together in 12 minute increments while my toddler is busy eating a snack. Teachers don’t make diddly and I’d like to retire someday. Please consider purchasing any supplies you would order anyway through one of the Amazon links located throughout my posts!

Usborne Publishing Ltd. has no connection with these pages and does not sponsor or support their content.

 

Five Little Pumpkins: A Multiple Intelligences Book Study

What is the Multiple Intelligence Theory and Why Do We Care?

Find Out Here

 

The Five Little Pumpkins by Tiger Tales and Ben Mantle is a padded hard cover book with bright    engaging graphics that keep little people’s attention and is a perfect way to introduce a Multiple Intelligences book study.

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Verbal/Linguistic:

While reading the book, make sure to stop and “picture walk” through each page. Discuss what is happening in the pictures, the colors of objects, use rich, descriptive phrases such as, “oh! I see there are some fuzzy spiders dangling down from their sticky webs all around the pumpkins! How many spiders are there? Let’s count them together! What colors are those spiders? Have you ever seen spiders like that in real life before? Where?” Emphasize rhyming words and the patterns found within the text.

Make sure to engage their own reflections about the story–“How would you feel if you were those pumpkins? How do you think they are feeling? Which pumpkin is your favorite? Why?”

 

reading

Mathematical/Logical:

I bought five miniature plastic treat pumpkins that we used to “narrate” the actions in the story. When the first pumpkin is talking in the story, we brought out one pumpkin, then two, etc. In this way, she is able to concretely assimilate what the concept of “five” looks and feels like. When the story was over, we used the pumpkins as containers to practice sorting pom poms by color, which is another foundational math concept. For added fine motor practice, use tongs instead of fingers to do the sorting.

 

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Visual/Spatial:

After doing a thorough picture walk, we picked out a page that she liked best. We then replicated the illustrations using art materials. We decided to use craft sticks, pipe cleaners, orange foam squares, and construction paper:

 

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Musical/Rhythmic:

Many children’s books have a natural rhythm to them, making it easier to pick up a “beat.” You can accentuate this by emphasizing end rhyme words. In addition, you can say the words to Five Little Pumpkins to the tune of “Five Little Monkeys” which they are probably already familiar with. We turned our pumpkins upside down and used them like drums while we were reading the text as well.

 

 drums again

 

Another way to extend the musical experimentation is to fill the pumpkins up with water in decreasing amounts. Fill the first pumpkin up to the top, the second just a little less, and so on until the fifth pumpkin barely has any in it at all. For extra sensory experience add food coloring so it is easier to see the depth. Then bang on each pumpkin with craft sticks, forks, etc to hear the different tones created.

 

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Bodily/Kinesthetic:

There are two types of body learners: those that need to use their gross motor skills (whole bodies) to process information and those that use their fine motor skills (tactile sensation) to process information. Some kids need both!

To engage whole body learning, encourage your child to use their bodies to “act out” the actions from the story. For example, when the pumpkins are sitting on the gate, ask them to pretend they are also sitting on a gate. (That might be tricky…they’ll need lots of balance..whoa!!) As the pumpkins roll down the hill, maybe they could so a few forward tucks?

roll

 

Playing a game of “Hide and Feely” is a super way to encourage the visual processing centers within the brain. In effect, you are helping them make the connections to build images in their “mind’s eye.” This is extremely critical in the process of reading comprehension. To play “Hide and Feely” you will need to hide objects, preferably with different textures, inside the pumpkins. Then, without looking, ask your child to place their hands inside the pumpkins to see if they can figure out what the objects are. As they do this they are taking mental snapshots between they way things feel and the ways things look. Some ideas for hiding are: cotton balls, rocks, dried beans, a small favorite toy, pretend flowers, or play dough.

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Intrapersonal:

Intrapersonal learners need time alone for self reflection in order to process information. Make sure your little one has a special comfy place to curl up with their favorite books.

 

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Interpersonal:

Interpersonal learners need to socialize and bounce ideas off of others to process information efficiently. If they are interpersonal AND verbal learners they may need a buddy to talk to about their book. Just sitting with and asking questions about what happened, what they liked, what do they think will happen next, etc. is exactly what they need. Otherwise, just sharing a book with a friend is perfect:

 

friends too

Like these ideas? Visit www.rainbootsandrocketships.com for more!


Rainbootsandrockeships.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This is a for-profit site that I put together in 12 minute increments while my toddler is busy eating a snack. Teachers don’t make diddly and I’d like to retire someday. Please consider purchasing any supplies you would order anyway through one of the Amazon links located throughout my posts!

 

 

 

A Sensory Fall

Fall is one of my favorite sensory themes to explore!

Pumpkins, apples, cinnamon, crunchy leaves? What’s not to love?!

Take a look at some brain boosting (and fun!) activities for you to enjoy with your little ones:

For More Information on WHY Sensory Activities are Important, Click HERE

    

                  Exploring Textures:

texture smooth bumpy                                                      

 

 

                                 Bumpy or Smooth? 

                    

                 Take a Sensory Walk…

                                             What do you hear?      What do you smell?

walk 2 loot walk

 

 

 

What do you feel? Is it bumpy? poky? sticky?

 

 

                                     

                                Squash Painting…

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         Apple Cinnamon Playdough!

                               For instructions click HERE:

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Acorn Jingle Bells

Thread some acorn jingle bells with pipe cleaners and let the jamboree begin!

 

acorn jingle bracelet

 

Fall Rain Stick

For instructions click HERE

 

 

Fall Sensory Bin

This sensory bin contains the following:

mixed dried red and pinto beans, decorative gourds, plastic pumpkins and leaves, white mini pumpkin, dried Indian corn, acorns,

yellow pom poms, whole cinnamon sticks, and fabric fall leaves. We also added an ice cream scoop and two smaller buckets

for fine motor skills and sorting practice.

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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Looking for Halloween sensory ideas?

                Look No More!…

 

                                              Glow In The Dark Bath Time….

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Add some blue and red food coloring to the bath water….and some glow in the dark spiders for a spooky clean good time!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                           Halloween Gooey Gunk

For instructions click HERE

 

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Halloween Sensory Bin

This sensory bin contains the following:

green, black, and purple pipe cleaners in multiple textures, glow in the dark spiders, orange foam blocks, orange and green containers with black measuring spoons, large rubber bat, large fuzzy tarantula, orange, purple, black and green pom poms in multiple sizes, green and purple velcro curlers, black foam curlers, chunky orange building blocks, and Halloween themed rubber erasers. These are all stored in a six gallon black container with orange Halloween lights surrounding the outside.

halloween bin

Like these ideas? Visit www.rainbootsandrocketships.com for more!


Rainbootsandrockeships.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This is a for-profit site that I put together in 12 minute increments while my toddler is busy eating a snack. Teachers don’t make diddly and I’d like to retire someday. Please consider purchasing any supplies you would order anyway through one of the Amazon links located throughout my posts!

 

Fall Rainstick

Sound is an experience that is often overlooked in a sensory diet.

Fix that now with a Fall themed Rainstick!

 

Materials needed:

paper towel tube (mailing tubes work much better, but aren’t free!), construction paper, markers, popcorn,

assorted fall nuts, glue (or hot glue gun), scissors, aluminum foil

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              Decorate your construction paper – we just used markers, but you could get fancy and paint, add stickers, or tassles!

            If you are using a paper towel tube instead of a mailing tube, you will need to make end caps. You can do this by either

          tracing a slightly larger circle (We used foam sheets.) and gluing them into the ends. You will need hot glue to make it stay.

           Or…if you dont mind a potential mess, you can roll up a very tight ball of aluminum foil and insert those into the ends.

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Once you’ve glued your decorated construction paper around your tube and placed ONE of you end caps, you’re ready to fill it up!

We used an assortment of popcorn kernels, walnuts, brazil nuts, and almonds frequently found in fall displays at the grocery store.

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                                                                                Add another end cap and you’re ready to Rock N Roll!

rainstick

Want to extend the fun? Order your copy of The Nutty Nut Chase!

nutty nut chase

Like these ideas? Check out www.rainbootsandrocketships.com for more!


Rainbootsandrockeships.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This is a for-profit site that I put together in 12 minute increments while my toddler is busy eating a snack. Teachers don’t make diddly and I’d like to retire someday. Please consider purchasing any supplies you would order anyway through one of the Amazon links located throughout my posts!

 

 

Applesauce Cinnamon Dough Ornaments

 

 

Nothing says Fall like the smell of Apples and Cinnamon in the air!

 The following recipe (and many other really awesome sensory recipes) can be found in The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions by John E. Thomas and Danita Pagel

 

        All you need is:

       1/2 cup of cinnamon, 1/2 cup of applesauce, some cookie cutters, a straw and a big baggie

applesauce

 

Pour the applesauce and cinnamon into the baggie and mix it up!

 

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Roll your dough and cut designs using your cookie cutters

 

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Let Air Dry, Add a Ribbon, And Smell the Apple Cinnamony Goodness!

 

Have some leftover dough? Add some water to a pot and simmer…Voila! A House full of Fall Smells!

 

Like this idea? Visit www.rainbootsandrocketships.com for more fun!


Rainbootsandrockeships.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This is a for-profit site that I put together in 12 minute increments while my toddler is busy eating a snack. Teachers don’t make diddly and I’d like to retire someday. Please consider purchasing any supplies you would order anyway through one of the Amazon links located throughout my posts!

 

Gooey Gunk

Halloween is the perfect time to engage your child’s senses in gooey, slimy fun!

 

Squishing slime is not only super stimulating to your child’s tactile sense, it’s also an excellent fine motor activity…building tiny finger muscles to be ready for holding pencils, tying shoes, and buttoning coats on chilly days.

Try this recipe for Gooey Gunk from The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions.

 

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Materials You Will Need:

Solution A: 1 cup water, 1 cup white glue, 7-10 drops of green food coloring

Solution B: 1 1/3 cups warm water and 4 tsp of Borax

Peanut was pretty antsy about getting her hands on the goods. The box of food coloring was especially tempting!

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To Make Solution A combine 1 cup of white glue, 1 cup of water, and 7-10 drops of food coloring in bowl.

We took this as an opportunity to talk about what a measuring cup is used for and how to do basic measurements.

I showed her where the number 1 was on the side of the cup. After showing her what “one cup” of glue looked like,

she was able to show me how much water should go in!”

We used  7 drops of food coloring, so if you’d like your slime a bit darker try up to 10 drops.

 

 

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Mix it all up!

We used a large craft stick to stir for easier clean up. This glue is washable and wipes up easily, but if you are using a non-washable glue it is a good idea to cover your work area.

The more we practice pouring and stirring, the better Peanut’s eye-hand coordination becomes!

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For Solution B combine 1 1/3 cups of WARM water and 4 tsp. of Borax in a SEPARATE bowl.

Stir until Borax is completely dissolved…mama handled this part for safety.

(Borax is not kid friendly – please watch them carefully!)

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SLOWLY pour Solution A into Solution B. DO NOT MIX!!!

Roll Solution A around in Solution B 4 – 5 times.

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Lift Solution A out of Solution B and knead for 2 -3 minutes.

Kneading of any kind is a fun to build fine motor skills…especially when you change up your medium. Practice kneading slime, dough, mud pies…and maybe even actual bread! ha!

You can play with it immediately or you can store it in an airtight container or zip lock bag.

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For extra slimy, spooky fun we added stretchy earthworms we found at the dollar store. She had fun folding, smooshing, and making worm prints for over an hour!

In addition to Halloween, this activity would also be fun for exploration into gardening, spring, composting, or worms in general. Change your food coloring dye to black to make it extra spooky…or brown to resemble wiggling through the mud!

This was only one of the super fun, science based recipes in The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions.  Visit www.rainbootsandrocketships.com for more ideas!


Rainbootsandrockeships.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This is a for-profit site that I put together in 12 minute increments while my toddler is busy eating a snack. Teachers don’t make diddly and I’d like to retire someday. Please consider purchasing any supplies you would order anyway through one of the Amazon links located throughout my posts!